Tag Archives: british

The latest project…

As you may have read previously, in November 2010 we successfully recovered the remains of the ex-Nocton Ambulance van to Apedale (Moseley Railway Trust). These remains comprised the main frames of the van (in need of considerable repair) & a rebuilt bogie frame. Unfortunately the mists of time have not been kind to this van and it’s chassis/bogies – there are a large number of parts currently AWOL, including most of the fittings/components for both bogies.

WDLR Bogie project - This frame arrived at Apedale from Alston with the Ambulance van in November 2010.

As the arrived bogie frame had been rebuilt several years prior to acquisition, I have taken the decision to start the re-construction of this bogie first. As I am fortunate to have collected together a number of spare parts/drawings over the years and now is the time to start using them! This project is not as impossible as it might seem, although it will deplete my spares holding significantly. These bogies are generally standard designs & could be found under many types of WW1 vehicle. What is this particular example going to be used under (pending the ambulance van being completed)? You’ll have to keep watching…

WDLR Bogie parts - Coupler & brake crank

The first stages of this reconstruction have been to start routing out parts & preparing them for assembly. However, before this all can progress too far, I need to get a set of coupler & leaf (suspension) springs on order….

Many parts! Amongst these are various WDLR bogie parts - including pivot, brake brackets, coupler link pin, etc

Notes on British & French light railway crew uniforms…..

Kindly provided by simon moore

British

The British Light Railway Operating Companies wore standard British Army Service Dress which consisted of ankle boots, khaki trousers and tunic with a grey collarless shirt beneath; the trousers being supported by braces.

The Royal Engineers insignia worn consisted of brass shoulder titles and a ‘GvR’ (George V) Royal Engineers cap badge in brass for Other Ranks and bronze for Officers, badges and devices denoting N.C.O rank were worn on both sleeves with Officers rank being denoted the standard brass shoulder devices.

The later pattern soft Service Dress caps or ‘Trench Caps’ seem to have been worn for the most part with the ubiquitous Mk.I ‘Brodie’ Helmet being worn in forward areas.
Puttees were not worn by all and seem to have been optional, perhaps being more commonly worn by guards who often had to dismount from the train.

Aside from the uniform various forms of overalls and working jackets and over trousers can be seen in photographs, as dictated by the peculiarities of running a railway. Men are also seen wearing the overall leather jerkins, an item of clothing dating back to Medieval long bow men and still worn by troops through to the 1980s, these were most often worn when working on exposed locos like the Crewe Tractors.

French

The French 60cm Light Railways were operated by men of the Artillery, more specifically men from the Régiments d’Artillerie à Pied or Foot Artillery Regiments, the men were mainly from the 10eme Régiment d’Artillerie à Pied until, in 1917, all men operating the Light Railways were transferred to a new unit, the 68eme Régiment d’Artillerie à Pied.

The men wore standard Artillerist’s uniform though this changed a great deal throughout the war as the gaudy red and blue uniform still worn in 1914 was superseded by various designs in the famous horizon blue. The uniform situation is further confused as many of the railway troops, not as reliant on camouflage as the men in the front line held on to more colourful items from their old uniforms long after they had disappeared elsewhere. The basics, irrelevant of colour were, like the British, ankle boots, trousers also termed ‘breeches’ which narrowed at the calf to allow the wearing of puttees. A collarless shirt in plain white or with grey pinstripes was worn with braces to support the trousers and over this a short-collared tunic and a greatcoat or ‘capote’ which was manufactured in various patterns.

Tunic collar insignia.

Above left; triangular greatcoat collar insignia of the 10eme Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied. Above Right; tunic collar insignia of the 68eme Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied.

The insignia was of standard Foot Artillery pattern; red collar patches showing the regimental number in dark green with piping in the same colour. A dark blue-black patch was sometimes also worn on the front of the kepi bearing the regimental number in red. Both Officer and NCO rank was denoted using standard French Army insignia.

 

French Artillery Railway - Uniform hats

Above top; the 1884 pattern kepi worn at the outset of hostilities badged to the 10eme Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied. Above bottom; the 1914-15 pattern horizon blue kepi badged to the 68eme Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied.

The Kepi worn at the outbreak of hostilities was made in dark blue-black cloth with red piping and seems to have been worn by many men until late in the conflict even though it had been officially superseded by a design in horizon blue, this later example can also be seen being worn in various photos. Adrian helmets seem to have been worn rarely by the railway men, when worn they carried the crossed cannon insignia of the Artillery on the front.

As with the British it seems the men operating the French Artillery Railways rarely wore puttees, though over trousers and overall jackets are often seen in photographs, from white through to dark shades though black and white photos don’t allow colour to be determined; these non-uniform items often being worn with the earlier pattern dark blue kepi.

More information is always welcomed – please leave a comment!